Posts Tagged ‘performance’

Support the new PROJECT PRINT Studio

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

Update:

Our Kickstarter was an epic fail, but we moved forward with a minimal print shop on the 4th floor of Neumann Leathers. We have one intaglio press and the gear to support etching, drypoint, block printing, and monotype. Contact us for details.

 

Help us invite artists to create a series of fine-art print editions in the processes of stone lithography, etching, drypoint, and monotype.

Project Studios in Hoboken, New Jersey, our company that provides studio space and creative support for individual artists and collectives, musicians, and creative companies and non-profits in the greater New York City area wants to re-open our print shop. Many of the artists we work with have expressed interest in having access to a traditional printmaking studio where they can create print editions or just get very creative with a medium that they don’t normally work with on a day-to-day basis.

The first step is to make our existing fine-art printmaking studio better serve the needs of local artists, by adding the stone lithography process to our capabilities. This will require the purchase of a lithography press, lithography stones, and the handling equipment required to support the medium. A good lithography press is a fairly large capital investment for a studio, and the stones themselves are quite rare and are difficult to obtain. Fortunately, we have located a private print shop that is selling exactly what we need. Our shop already has the tools for etching, engraving, drypoint, monotype, and wood cut printing including an intaglio press.

The second part of the equation is giving selected area artists free access to the print studio for six months. During that time the artists may work on anything they like, but they will also be required to produce sets of prints that will be distributed as rewards to backers of this project. The studio will provide some special found paper with historical relevance that artists may choose to work with including old paper garment patterns from the leather factory where the studio is housed, and antique blueprints from the now-vanished dockyards of Hoboken.

You can help make this happen by contributing to this project, and you will be rewarded with original artwork from artists that we invite to the studio. There is also an option to take a short printmaking class.

Pledge your support and receive original artwork as a thank-you gift.

The final celebration of the successful project will be an exhibition and opening reception party at Proto Gallery, a local contemporary art gallery in Hoboken. All artists participating in the project may exhibit prints generated during the duration of their free residencies.

New Studio Shares at Neumann Leathers

Friday, October 4th, 2013

We have an availability right now in our 4th floor shared space. See below for details about the studio.

4th Floor Share: 20 ft. x 14ft. (suite: 24 ft. x 45 ft. 1080 sq. ft.) 525.00

 

We have built a few semi-private studios at the Neumann Leathers building in Hoboken. These are contained within a 1100 sq. ft. suite with a 12 ft. ceiling. Each studio has 8 ft. walls dividing it from the neighboring studios, but the natural light from the windows lights up all of the spaces. The suite is air-conditioned and heated, and the two windows can be opened for fresh air.

4th Floor Share: 20 ft. x 14ft. (suite: 24 ft. x 45 ft. 1080 sq. ft.) 575.00

4th Floor Share: 10 ft. x 14ft. (suite: 24 ft. x 45 ft. 1080 sq. ft.) 300.00

 

4th Floor Studio Share

 

The spaces are suitable for drawing, painting, sculpture, or other creative pursuits. They are not suitable for music rehearsal. Obviously, some courtesy to studio mates is a requirement. The lease term is month-to-month, so these are great starter studios.

Bantam + Mechanics: Precursor: A Press Play

Friday, October 16th, 2009

How does one begin to enter the American car culture? In grade school, we drew flaming hot-rod Mustangs, Army tanks, and fast fighter jets. Now, as we enter this culture in earnest, with real desire, we follow that same path. Printmaking allows us to once again work together, and begin to define a path for this project. A literal blueprint is used, for example, in some of these prints, that is then altered or even destroyed by a artist’s mark. The blueprint is a plan, and the mark is the effort to take the pedestrian or commercial antique object and convert it to artwork. In doing this, yes, the antique is destroyed, but a new object is born. This is a model for what we will do with our Bantam Roadster in many ways. The new object, in our case, respects the original albeit antique automobile, but we do not fear the damage of provenance that will likely occur.

Our prints are marks of redaction and burnouts on historical documents and plain paper.

These prints illustrate the simplest reduction of what the overall long-term work will be.

http://www.bantammechanics.com/precursor/

De Pirro + Williams

Taurobolium: De Pirro + Williams

Friday, May 29th, 2009

Taurobolium from Nick De Pirro on Vimeo.

As promised, albeit rather late, here is the mostly edited two-camera video sequence from Taurobolium. Thanks to freelance videographer Brian McGinn, and Mark Remollino of Ambush for the camera work; editing by Project Studios. The original audio composition was created Brian Beard. This is documentation footage. The artwork is the performance, this is not intended to be a replacement for it.

Taurobolium was performed for the Hoboken Studio Tour event October 19. 2008. I just recently got my paws on the second DV tape, so the delay is now over. We created a small-scale poster campaign for the show using my big Xerox Phaser. The first poster uses the infamous Neumann emblem and the second poster usurps a Frederick Remington image of a steer being roped for branding. The Phaser can print wax right to heavy printmaking paper, so the posters had a good weight to them and looked like they came from a silkscreen shop.

 

 

Taurobolium Poster with Neumann Emblem

Taurobolium Poster with Remington Image

 

I might as well describe a bit of what this performance was about. At the time, the Neumann Leathers factory complex was the center of a development and zoning dispute in Hoboken. From the start, I was always skeptical and am still convinced that the developers will get their hands on the property very soon.Taurobolium was representative of the face offs that were very literally happening once a month at Hoboken City Hall. Ian and I wanted to create a face off of our own, borrowing loosely from the Agamemnon battle scene from Time Bandits. The minotaur is a anthropomorphized factory, and the gladiator is progress, development, etc. Taurobolium is a historical term describing a Roman practice of bull sacrifice, and in this case, the tragic figure of the Minotaur, with the unfortunate circumstances of his conception, is a perfect representation of the factory. Dirty, toxic, neglected, and exploited, the factory stands to loose. Progress wears him down like a matador wears down his opponent through tricks and choreography. The bull only knows the basic rules for fighting and can’t see what is really happening to him.

Visually, the piece consists of two performers, a twelve-foot clay powder circle ringed by a plaster powder stripe. The space is a derelict room in the Neumann Leathers factory on the ground floor. The space is unused and thick with dust. It also contains a massive tumbler used in the tanning process. The tumbler room is lit from the inside, so spectators can get a good look at its details. The Neumann Leathers logo crest is outlined in white plaster in the center of the clay ring. The bovine character’s body is coated in wet clay slip. Additional wet clay leeches out of a yoke around his neck built of bundled leather strips made in the former factory itself. The bovine mask is a modified and exaggerated bull skull with a maine and a tail that drags at his feet.

The opponent wears the clothing of a factory worker, including a leather apron, work gloves, boots, and coveralls. He is dusted with clay powder, and wears an elaborate Roman centurion’s helmet. He is a hybrid figure having the features of both destroyer of the minotaur and the maker of leather goods.

This battle, for me, is the perfect model for the labyrinthine machinations of a development project as it engages the target and destroys it. Every word and every maneuver is dubious. The old factory that served a purpose becomes an anathema and must be destroyed so that the future can take its path and forget its mistakes.

I suppose the factory itself is a labyrinth as well, with the Taurobolium at the center of the maze, but this is perhaps the first read of the piece. The factory is a maze in a very practical sense, an unknown black spot for most of the residents of Hoboken. If for some viewers, this is the maximum depth of meaning for the performance, we would be satisfied. The battle itself is intended to carry the underlying narrative of the battle between the future and past, or in the site specific context, development versus the past. Whether or not the viewer sees the link between themselves and the matador is another question altogether.

As the performance progresses, the audio track becomes more energetic and the face off of the performers gets a little more aggressive. It is all posturing and compensating; a chase. The clay and plaster drawing becomes destroyed by charging feet, and the bull eventually crashes into the center of the ring, wiping out the emblem.

A few links to other images and stories from the event are below. There was not much press, mostly because Hoboken’s art scene is pretty weak no matter what they tell you.

NJ.com’s Jersey Journal

Photo of one of the posters

Studio Tour Map

Bantam + Mechanics

Sunday, December 7th, 2008

 

Bantam Roadster Cockpit

 

Here is an image of the centerpiece of the next De Pirro + Williams collaborative adventure. This is the cockpit of a 1938 Bantam Roadster that we will be restoring as part of a long-term performance installation.

 

Taurobolium

Sunday, December 7th, 2008

Here is a teaser shot of the Taurobolium performance from October. Nick De Pirro + Ian Williams first public performance since Circumambulator. We put this together for the Hoboken Studio Tour to make a statement about the battle for the building that is currently going on at city hall. Of course, the usual De Pirro + Williams features were present, with the addition of a soundtrack by Brian Beard. We have some good 1080p and SD video of the performance that has yet to be edited. Stay tuned for a web stream. 

Update: I just posted the video: Taurobolium Video

Taurobolium De Pirro + Williams