Posts Tagged ‘De Pirro’

Support the new PROJECT PRINT Studio

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

Update:

Our Kickstarter was an epic fail, but we moved forward with a minimal print shop on the 4th floor of Neumann Leathers. We have one intaglio press and the gear to support etching, drypoint, block printing, and monotype. Contact us for details.

 

Help us invite artists to create a series of fine-art print editions in the processes of stone lithography, etching, drypoint, and monotype.

Project Studios in Hoboken, New Jersey, our company that provides studio space and creative support for individual artists and collectives, musicians, and creative companies and non-profits in the greater New York City area wants to re-open our print shop. Many of the artists we work with have expressed interest in having access to a traditional printmaking studio where they can create print editions or just get very creative with a medium that they don’t normally work with on a day-to-day basis.

The first step is to make our existing fine-art printmaking studio better serve the needs of local artists, by adding the stone lithography process to our capabilities. This will require the purchase of a lithography press, lithography stones, and the handling equipment required to support the medium. A good lithography press is a fairly large capital investment for a studio, and the stones themselves are quite rare and are difficult to obtain. Fortunately, we have located a private print shop that is selling exactly what we need. Our shop already has the tools for etching, engraving, drypoint, monotype, and wood cut printing including an intaglio press.

The second part of the equation is giving selected area artists free access to the print studio for six months. During that time the artists may work on anything they like, but they will also be required to produce sets of prints that will be distributed as rewards to backers of this project. The studio will provide some special found paper with historical relevance that artists may choose to work with including old paper garment patterns from the leather factory where the studio is housed, and antique blueprints from the now-vanished dockyards of Hoboken.

You can help make this happen by contributing to this project, and you will be rewarded with original artwork from artists that we invite to the studio. There is also an option to take a short printmaking class.

Pledge your support and receive original artwork as a thank-you gift.

The final celebration of the successful project will be an exhibition and opening reception party at Proto Gallery, a local contemporary art gallery in Hoboken. All artists participating in the project may exhibit prints generated during the duration of their free residencies.

New Studio Shares at Neumann Leathers

Friday, October 4th, 2013

We have an availability right now in our 4th floor shared space. See below for details about the studio.

4th Floor Share: 20 ft. x 14ft. (suite: 24 ft. x 45 ft. 1080 sq. ft.) 525.00

 

We have built a few semi-private studios at the Neumann Leathers building in Hoboken. These are contained within a 1100 sq. ft. suite with a 12 ft. ceiling. Each studio has 8 ft. walls dividing it from the neighboring studios, but the natural light from the windows lights up all of the spaces. The suite is air-conditioned and heated, and the two windows can be opened for fresh air.

4th Floor Share: 20 ft. x 14ft. (suite: 24 ft. x 45 ft. 1080 sq. ft.) 575.00

4th Floor Share: 10 ft. x 14ft. (suite: 24 ft. x 45 ft. 1080 sq. ft.) 300.00

 

4th Floor Studio Share

 

The spaces are suitable for drawing, painting, sculpture, or other creative pursuits. They are not suitable for music rehearsal. Obviously, some courtesy to studio mates is a requirement. The lease term is month-to-month, so these are great starter studios.

Happy New Year: Rent This

Friday, December 28th, 2012

Happy New Year from the Special Projects Department at Project Studios. Sure, we are getting closer to launching Proto Gallery, but there is still time for a Stealth B-2 studio for art or music. Looks nice, right? This bad boy is currently in development, but we want to either lease the entire space to one tenant, or split it down the middle for two. Give us a shout. It’s supersonic with a massive payload with close proximity to our heaviest freight elevator, 220 V 3-Phase power available, numerous windows, and sexy old factory floors.

New Art Studios for Rent in Hoboken

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

December 2016

 

We have a few spaces that will be available for December 2016. Contact us immediately for details.

4th Floor Share: 10 ft. x 14ft. (suite: 24 ft. x 45 ft. 1080 sq. ft.) $350.00

3rd Floor Private: 500 sq. ft. $1200.00

3rd Floor Private: 350 sq. ft. $600.00

 

January 2016

With the closing of the Art Factory in Paterson, NJ, we once again see development squeezing the habitat of our artists and creatives. The R. Neumann and Co. leather factory in Hoboken, where Project Studios is located, is under new ownership, and this time the city of Hoboken City Council has voted on a development plan that includes explicit requirements to maintain the creative studios and shop space in the existing buildings on the property. Project Studios has been working closely with building ownership to provide a vision of what art, music, and gallery spaces can look like in a future renovation of Neumann Leathers.

Neumann Leathers will continue to be a core creative zone for the foreseeable future in Hoboken. Contact us with any questions about studio availability. We have many projects in the works that can accommodate artists and musicians displaced by the Art Factory closing.

Recently, with PROTO Gallery’s MEGALODON pop-up group exhibition, a new 6000 sq. ft. space has been added to the roster of active creative spaces in at R. Neumann. A series of exhibitions and events are currently being scheduled for 2016, beginning with a group show of Neumann Leathers tenants. Stay tuned to PROTO Gallery and Project Studios social media for details and announcements.

 

 

 

January 2015

We have new studio availability for the new year! We have cut down one of our large spaces to create three semi-private spaces on the 5th floor of R. Neumann and Co. on Newark Street. We also have one available space on the 4th floor of 300 Observer Highway, and we have opened up our mini printmaking shop as well.

 

4th Floor Share: 20 ft. x 14ft. (suite: 24 ft. x 45 ft. 1080 sq. ft.) $525.00

5th Floor Share: 20 ft. x 17 ft. (irregular) (suite: 25 ft. x 45 ft. 1125 sq. ft.) $600.00

 

5th Floor Share: 20 ft. x 30 ft. (irregular) (suite: 25 ft. x 45 ft. 600 sq. ft.) $900.00

 

July 2013

The Project Studios Spring Expansion is underway. We will be offering the following studios starting June 1, 2013. Contact us immediately if you are interested in any of the following options. All of these studios are either on the 3rd or 4th floors of Neumann Leathers in Hoboken. We give them silly code names to keep track of them.

 

4th Floor Share: 20 ft. x 14ft. (suite: 24 ft. x 45 ft. 1080 sq. ft.) 575.00

4th Floor Share: 10 ft. x 14ft. (suite: 24 ft. x 45 ft. 1080 sq. ft.) 300.00

 

The Dana: 20 ft. x 18 ft. 360 sq. ft. $700.00

The Danielle: 36 ft. x. 25 ft. 900 sq. ft. $1400.00

Proto South: 14.5 ft. x 12 ft. 175 sq. ft. $450.00

The Egg Shell: 36.5 ft. x 23.5 ft. 850 sq. ft. $1500.00

The Small Shop: 19 ft. x 45 ft. 855 sq. ft. $1600.00

The Master: 24 ft. x 45 ft. 1080 sq. ft. $1600.00

The Standard: 19.5 ft. x 18 ft. 350 sq. ft. $550.00

The Standard II: 19.5 ft. x 18 ft. 350 sq. ft. $550.00

The Old Nino: 350 sq. ft. $575.00

The Old Kevin: 15 ft. x 36 ft. 540 sq. ft. $950.00

The Sneak: 15.5 ft. x 17. 5 ft. 275 sq. ft. $500.00

The Little Beth: 10.5 ft. x 22.5 ft. 235 sq. ft. $425.00

 

The prices are based not only on square footage alone.  Windows, electrical power, type of door, or other factors influence the price. A freight elevator and passenger elevator are located in very close proximity to these studios. They are located on the 4th floor of Neumann Leathers in Hoboken, NJ. The location in the building is considered by us to be premium as it is right in the heart of the art and music section of the building, and has the convenience of the passenger elevator. All studios have locking steel doors and are private. All utilities are included. The spaces named shop have significant electrical service in place including 22o v for tools and equipment. The shop spaces are also appropriate for music.

 

October 2012 Update:

We have built two new beautiful studios on the Willow Avenue side of Neumann Leathers. These studios were made available for October 1, 2012, and are no longer available. Enjoy the studios!

Studio #1: 505 sq. ft., double door: $850

Studio #2: 350 sq. ft. Single door: $600

 

If you want a studio, call me maybe.

 

Update: All of our new studios in the far east wing are now leased to artists.

Congratulations to our new tenants as they begin to make use of their new spaces.

 

Willow Avenue Studios:

We are happy to announce the completion of five new art studio spaces at the Neumann Leathers factory building in Hoboken, New Jersey. The new spaces are for fine artists, designers, and other creative professionals. We have one space remaining, and another currently occupied space will become available October 1, 2011.

 

20′ x 16′ @ 300 sq. ft.  two windows. $450.00 per month.
12′ x 20′ 6″ @ 250 sq. ft. one window, with ability to install a second  $375.00.
20′ x 13′ @ 270 sq. ft.  one window, with ability to install a second  $425.00
20′ x 13′ @ 270 sq. ft. one window, with ability to install a second  $425.00
20′ x 18′ @ 370 sq. ft.  one window, with ability to install a second  $550.00

About the Studios:


The studios are located on the 3rd floor of the Newman Leather Building; a few blocks of the PATH train station in Hoboken and a few blocks from the Holland Tunnel by car.
The available space is a section of a larger space that is divided into individual studios on the 3rd Floor of the Neumann Building. The studio is secured with a large steel door. All walls are sheetrock with a brick wall and window. The ceiling height for all studio spaces is 10 ft. Floors are wood. An operational sprinkler system is in place, and the enclosing space in the warehouse has an exterior fire escape and internal stairwell nearby. A very large freight elevator and shared bathroom are in close proximity to the big room. The bathroom is regularly cleaned by a professional cleaning service. The building is open 24 hours, and a security guard is on duty from about 4 PM until 8 AM.

Art studios on the 3rd floor are monitored by automatic cameras for added security. Internet is available via a shared wifi connection. The neighborhood is very safe. There are plenty of good places to eat and hang out within a few minutes walk from the building. Parking for tenants is in a lot on the property, which is enclosed by a fence. There is no fee for tenant parking.
Spaces are intended for designers, painters, and sculptors. High voltage power is available, but additional fees for installation and heavy energy use will apply. All studios have florescent that can be turned on and off.

If a studio is rented by more than one individual, an additional fee will apply.

Heat, electrical, and trash service is included.

Two New Studios at Neumann Leathers in Hoboken for October

Monday, September 24th, 2012

We have just completed two new studios in the Neumann Leathers Factory that will be ready for leasing/licensing October 2012. One studio is about 350 sq. ft. and the other is about 500 sq. ft. give or take. Anybody who is looking for a studio should just contact us directly to get a tour and get the final price. Hyza Laurente and her crew jumped into one of the (brand new and still unfinished) spaces this weekend for a few hours of photography.

 

Plaster Neumann: Cursed Object

Wednesday, January 5th, 2011

This is the sculpture formerly known as Plaster Neumann now retitled as Plaster Neumann: Cursed Object. I have been interested in making a cursed or haunted object for quite some time, but I could never figure it out. I thought I had a chair that would right itself late at night each time I violently kicked it over, but it failed to reset more often than not, so there must have been some normal explanation, unfortunately.

Ater the chair was debunked, and the proposal for an exhibition of haunted objects stalled, I added the concept to that very long list in my head where I keep this kind of stuff. Maybe now it is time to revisit this idea, who knows.

The Plaster Neumann has a pretty strange history, so here goes. The first detail is that the core of the object is an artifact from the Neumann Leather factory in Hoboken. The object was then fixed to a jigger machine/mold to create the cylinder that encases it. The casing is mostly hydrocal with a float layer of plaster on the face. It is pretty tough and can be rolled around. The sculpture was present for the unfortunate event that you can read about in Epic Fail when somebody killed himself about 10 feet away from the Plaster Neumann. After that, the Neumann was packed up and moved to storage on the ground floor in another studio that I was renting for about a year. Almost as soon as it was moved down there, the space flooded from a cracked water main. After that the object got moved back up to my 3rd floor space and sat quietly until last month. I needed better documentation of Plaster Neumann, so I got it back into the shop to seal it and patch up the cracks and manage the water damage. I left town for the holidays, and upon my return, water again, this time a few hundred gallons poured directly on the sculpture the Wednesday before New Years Day. Nobody was in the building and the water destroyed artwork and antiques on 4 floors of the building. Once again, the Plaster Neumann looks like hell, which at this point I have decided must be the default state. Yesterday, once I had it set up for new photos, water started leaking from above right onto my camera bag.

The solution I am attempting is to use a sort of counter curse to quell the uneasy sculpture. I figure that if I can name the sculpture’s curse, I can contain the curse. If the object is dry or draws water to it, I can provide water with the hieroglyph for water and hopefully reduce the damage to the studio.

Taurobolium: De Pirro + Williams

Friday, May 29th, 2009

Taurobolium from Nick De Pirro on Vimeo.

As promised, albeit rather late, here is the mostly edited two-camera video sequence from Taurobolium. Thanks to freelance videographer Brian McGinn, and Mark Remollino of Ambush for the camera work; editing by Project Studios. The original audio composition was created Brian Beard. This is documentation footage. The artwork is the performance, this is not intended to be a replacement for it.

Taurobolium was performed for the Hoboken Studio Tour event October 19. 2008. I just recently got my paws on the second DV tape, so the delay is now over. We created a small-scale poster campaign for the show using my big Xerox Phaser. The first poster uses the infamous Neumann emblem and the second poster usurps a Frederick Remington image of a steer being roped for branding. The Phaser can print wax right to heavy printmaking paper, so the posters had a good weight to them and looked like they came from a silkscreen shop.

 

 

Taurobolium Poster with Neumann Emblem

Taurobolium Poster with Remington Image

 

I might as well describe a bit of what this performance was about. At the time, the Neumann Leathers factory complex was the center of a development and zoning dispute in Hoboken. From the start, I was always skeptical and am still convinced that the developers will get their hands on the property very soon.Taurobolium was representative of the face offs that were very literally happening once a month at Hoboken City Hall. Ian and I wanted to create a face off of our own, borrowing loosely from the Agamemnon battle scene from Time Bandits. The minotaur is a anthropomorphized factory, and the gladiator is progress, development, etc. Taurobolium is a historical term describing a Roman practice of bull sacrifice, and in this case, the tragic figure of the Minotaur, with the unfortunate circumstances of his conception, is a perfect representation of the factory. Dirty, toxic, neglected, and exploited, the factory stands to loose. Progress wears him down like a matador wears down his opponent through tricks and choreography. The bull only knows the basic rules for fighting and can’t see what is really happening to him.

Visually, the piece consists of two performers, a twelve-foot clay powder circle ringed by a plaster powder stripe. The space is a derelict room in the Neumann Leathers factory on the ground floor. The space is unused and thick with dust. It also contains a massive tumbler used in the tanning process. The tumbler room is lit from the inside, so spectators can get a good look at its details. The Neumann Leathers logo crest is outlined in white plaster in the center of the clay ring. The bovine character’s body is coated in wet clay slip. Additional wet clay leeches out of a yoke around his neck built of bundled leather strips made in the former factory itself. The bovine mask is a modified and exaggerated bull skull with a maine and a tail that drags at his feet.

The opponent wears the clothing of a factory worker, including a leather apron, work gloves, boots, and coveralls. He is dusted with clay powder, and wears an elaborate Roman centurion’s helmet. He is a hybrid figure having the features of both destroyer of the minotaur and the maker of leather goods.

This battle, for me, is the perfect model for the labyrinthine machinations of a development project as it engages the target and destroys it. Every word and every maneuver is dubious. The old factory that served a purpose becomes an anathema and must be destroyed so that the future can take its path and forget its mistakes.

I suppose the factory itself is a labyrinth as well, with the Taurobolium at the center of the maze, but this is perhaps the first read of the piece. The factory is a maze in a very practical sense, an unknown black spot for most of the residents of Hoboken. If for some viewers, this is the maximum depth of meaning for the performance, we would be satisfied. The battle itself is intended to carry the underlying narrative of the battle between the future and past, or in the site specific context, development versus the past. Whether or not the viewer sees the link between themselves and the matador is another question altogether.

As the performance progresses, the audio track becomes more energetic and the face off of the performers gets a little more aggressive. It is all posturing and compensating; a chase. The clay and plaster drawing becomes destroyed by charging feet, and the bull eventually crashes into the center of the ring, wiping out the emblem.

A few links to other images and stories from the event are below. There was not much press, mostly because Hoboken’s art scene is pretty weak no matter what they tell you.

NJ.com’s Jersey Journal

Photo of one of the posters

Studio Tour Map

The Boss: POLAROID #4

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009

 

De Pirro the Boss

The sequel to Get Serious, The Boss was also created as an identification photo at the Sherman Studio Art Center. Ian saved this one as well. Speaking of Sherman studios, I came this close to tossing a roadkill skunk into one of the glass furnaces over there one night. This photo features a Delille Oxygen welding cap, in effect!

DIY Etching Press: From Memory

Sunday, March 29th, 2009

 

The new (used) etching press has arrived. Remo and I unloaded it about a week ago and I finally got around to really cleaning it up and setting the micro-gauges so that I  can actually use it. I still need to level it, but the floor is so uneven, I will probably just put blocks under the feet. I apologize for the photos, I took them with my iPhone under fluorescent lights. I did all this setup from memory, and the last time I put a hand on a press was almost 10 years ago. I have my Dad’s awesome printmaking book, but I have not taken it out yet. The press itself is a joint venture between Kivetz, Ian Williams, and myself. Here is a little description of what I did to fire it up.

Step one: Get yourself an etching press. I guess you could build one, but it might be faster to buy one. To build one you are going to need a GTAW machine, Engine Lathe, and Milling Machine. You can probably buy most of the bearings pretty easily, but I digress. I bought a used one from a guy up in Teaneck. It was in his garage, just about completely walled in with junk. It was a pretty serious job extracting it. Remo had a good time because he appreciates humorous situations. We loaded it on my trailer, took it down the turnpike, and then rolled it right into the shop on a pallet jack. This press has a 28″ x 48″ bed. Not too shabby, but the real nice thing about this press is the size of the rollers. It also has a gear reduction crank case and no captain’s wheel. I am pretty sure I can make a big wheel for it, but I am not sure if I can secure it without removing the crank case. I would like to keep them both if possible. 

Martek 28\

Step 2: Polish that old hulk. I cleaned up all of the visible metal on the press with non-woven abrasives and steel wool. I removed some pieces to better clean them, but I didn’t go crazy. W-D 40 all around. The blankets are from the previous owner, and they are pretty moth-eaten and there is no sizing catcher. Add blankets to the shopping list. Also, the Martek label fell off.

Step 3: Zero out the press by bottoming out the top roller against the bed. Once you hit the bed, take up the slack in the threads so that all the play is out, but the roller is not lifted. I am talking about maybe a half turn or less. You can now move your gauges to the zero mark and lock them down.

Step 4: Cut some grid paper and cover that newly shined up bed. You could be all 17th century and leave the bed exposed, but let’s make it easy and register everything on a nice sheet of 1/8″ grid.

Lexan Sheet on Martek Press Bed

Step 5: Get a sheet of Lexan and cut it to the measurements of the bed. Cover the grid paper to keep your grid and your final print media clean. I just used some clear packing tape to secure it to each end of the bed. Note: Lexan is not all that easy to work with. You are also going to have to be aware that you just added thickness to the bed, so your zero mark is not zero any longer- not that it matters.

Step 6: Run a few test prints to get your pressure set. I don’t have a sizing catcher, and the pusher blanket is in pretty bad shape, but I was able to get a print. The main issue is that the studio is a sculpture shop, and I don’t have everything for proper printmaking yet. I was not able to soak my paper, so I just spritzed it and blotted it. Apparently not enough sizing was removed and the print was pretty light with a good amount of ink left on the plate. I am pretty sure my pressure was good, but it probably could have been a bit higher. Having proper blankets would have probably helped also, but I am pretty sure this was a paper issue. I was happy just to smell the ink again.

Here is the print. Again, lousy iPhone image, but you get the idea. The plate is a “full sized” Revere zinc plate that has been exposed to the elements for about 10 years or more. It had cardboard against it at one time, so it etched naturally. I am working the image very slightly, adding dry-point marks. Eventually, this will become the substrate for an image of the American Bantam rooster, or maybe not. I am planning some Bantam prints no matter what. I just never know what any plate is going to look like when it is done.

First Dry-Point Print from the Martek Press

Steel Sphere for New Albany

Tuesday, February 17th, 2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is an image from the digital archive circa September 2003 at the Columbus, OH studio in the Arena District. This dude, John Bobb III gets the photo credit. I am sure I will elaborate on the circumstances of the Columbus studio in a future post. As far as characters go, the Union Tools studio had a cast that represented a full order of magnitude beyond any other place I have set up shop.

The steel ball in the photo was built for the public library in New Albany, OH, a suburb of Columbus. I guess it is a suburb, it is more of an enclave, I suppose. Whatever the town is, they needed a globe for the main space right in the center of the building above the circulation desk. I got involved in the project through a friend, sculptor Alan Hamwi, who works almost exclusively in bronze and lacks the structural welding chops to safely weld something that would hang above children’s heads. Al produced an element that went inside the ball. The final sphere was pretty tricked out, and actually split in half along two concentric bolting rings so that I could get it out my door and into the library. The photo shows it pretty early in the fabrication process with my DeLille Oxygen cap in full effect.